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Giant Phantom Jellyfish: A Rare Sighting of a Giant Inky Black Ocean Wonder

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The ocean is a massive and mysterious environment. The dark abyss contains many wonders that few people have seen. One of these rare sights, the giant phantom jellyfish, was recently discovered by Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) researchers. While gathering data with one of their ROVs at around 3,200 feet deep in the ocean’s depths, they came across this stunning animal.
The name ” phantom ” is entirely appropriate because encounters with these beautiful, mysterious monsters are so rare that “phantom” is correct. The enigmatic jelly, which may be found between the surface and depths of up to 21,900 feet below the earth’s surface, is generally discovered in the late zone (between 3,280 and 13,120 feet deep). The researchers were particularly interested in determining how the creature obtained its own food. It appears to be a rare species, with only nine sightings reports. It appears that it’s a rare organism, with only nine records of sightings. MBARI has reported that scientists have only encountered the colossal phantom jellyfish about 100 times in total since its discovery in 1899. Fortunately, this one was caught on video.
In the video, the gorgeous creature’s billowing tentacles flutter in the water like delicate curtains of silk blown by a mild wind. The curves, which appear to be from a high-fashion underwater photoshoot rather than on the body of a colossal deep-sea creature, flow freely. With a bell more than 3 meters across, the giant phantom jellyfish has four “ribbon-like” arms that serve as mouths and can reach lengths of more than 33 feet. The glowing, crimson hues of the bottom are further illuminated by the lurid red scallops that crawl over it. The jelly’s elegant motions, smooth and fluid, almost seem to have been choreographed for an enchanted underwater ballet.
Scroll down to see MBARI’s breathtaking deep-sea video of the stunningly giant phantom jellyfish. Visit their website for more deep-sea creature discoveries.

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